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Jazz News Volume4 No45 0009

Jazz News Volume4 No45 0009

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Page 16
4ZZ /VEIt'S — Saturday, December 24, 1960
THE
WELLINS-
WRAY
QUINTET
HISTORY
The group was formed by
the co-leaders last month
and has become resident at
Ronnie Scott's club.
AIMS
To play ‘their kind of
jazz', as often as possible!
PERSONNEL
Ken Wray (trombone):
Was born in 1927 in Manc-
hester. Ken is a veteran
section man and jazz soloist
from the days when there
were dozens of name bands
touring the concert and
dance halls of Britain.
Amongs the bands he work-
ed for are Joe Loss, Oscar
Rabin. Vic Lewis, Jack
Parnell, Ronnie Scott (nine-
piece and big band), Tony
Crombie, Jimmy Deuchar
Sextet two years in Ger-
many with Kurt Edelhagen,
Personal Appearance
Johnny Dankworth, the
Herman Anglo - American
Herd and many club groups.
His favourites are many, in-
cluding Parker and Bill
Harris. His only hobby is
music.
Bobby Wellins (tenor sax);
Was born on Glasgow's
South Side in 1936- He has
played with Malcolm Mit-
chell. Vic Lewis, Tony
Crombie, the Jazz Com-
mittee. Tony Kinsey and
many jazz club groups- Is
recognised as one of the
brightest young stars on his
instrument. Asked his fav-
ourite musicians, he replied
‘Elvis Presley and Adam
Faith-' He refuses to name
his hobbies!
Gordon Beck (piano);
Was horn in Brixton, Lon-
don. in 1936- Originally a
draughtsman, he began to
play piano about four years
ago. While in Canada in
1957. he became influenced
by jazz, and on his return
to England the next year he
met and was impressed by
young alto star Peter King.
He got his first ‘big chance’
at the Scott Club, where he
has been much in demand
as a sideman- He has play-
ed with many jazz names,
including Tony Crombie in
Monte Carlo earlier this
year. He likes Parker and
Gillespie, Bud Powell, Duke
Ellington, and Milt Jackson
among many. He is a philo-
sophical and dedicated
young musician.
Tony Archer (bass): Was
born in Dulwich, 1939. He
played some cello in school
and later studied bass at
Lungbourne Evening Insti-
tute. One of the best known
young bass players on the
local scene, he has played
jazz dates with ‘just about
the lot’ on the British scene,
and toured U.S. bases on
the Continent with Johnny
Birch, also appearing at the
Chat qui Peche in Paris. He
names Paul Chambers,
Phillv Joe Jones, Miles.
Coltrane, Cannonball and
Junior Mance among his
favourites. His hobby is
‘bass repairing’ and among
his ambitions a trip to the
States to study.
Peter Baker (drums) was
born in Lewisham in 1939.
‘Ginger’ has been playing
from an early age and
bought his first real kit for
£3 at age 16- He played
among the Trads (Storyville
Jazzmen, Bob Wallis, Hugh
Rainey) for some time,
turned professional in 1956
and joined Terry Lightfoot
in 1957. After intensive
practice, he played for a
spell in Palais bands, until
his debut on the modern
scene at the Scott club in
early 1960 with Brian Dec.
As well as looking like
Phil Seamen, he is regarded
as something of his disciple.
His favourites are many, in-
cluding Buddy Rich, Charlie
Persip, Elvin Jones, Ornette
Coleman and the Gillespie
Big Band. He claims paint-
ing (‘like, Art') as his re-
laxation.
WHERE TO FIND
THEM: Resident every
Monday at the Ronnie Scott
Club.
MUSICIANS CORNER
Wormald keyboard, each scale
is mechanically the same.
Everything is a mere matter
of distance and not of finger
shapes, and familiarity with
the interval distances is a mat-
ter of practice. To play the
same chord in another key in-
volves simply a movement of
the whole hand, the relative
position of the fingers remain-
ing the same.
The concept of a keyboard
not built around the open C
major scale with no sharps or
flats standing defiantly above
the white notes is an attractive
one. but I don’t feel that Mr.
Wormald's solution is the mosi
practical one-
The use of seven different
coloured keys rules out the pos-
sibility of blind or even colour
blind musicians using the key-
board, and a world of piano
jazz without Tatum. Shearing
and Ray Charles is inconceiv-
able!
ILLOGICAL
That the orthodox keyboard
is illogical, I agree with Gor-
don Wormald, and his observa-
tions on the intervals between
major and minor being con-
stant would make a keyboard
such as the one he suggests a
more practical one.
Without actually construct-
ing a keyboard on the lines he
suggests, it is difficult to im-
agine just how different its
manipulation would be.
Mr. Wormald is an amusing
writer. His comments on
critics, promenade concert au-
diences and pop music are
rather charming, and his style
conversational and easy to
follow.
One sad defect is that after
churning through several pages
of explanation on the Tonic
Sol-Fah. we are left with under
four pages of description and
comment on his theory.
Perhaps musicians would
like to read this book tor
themselves and write to ‘Musi-
cians Corner’ with their own
observations and ideas.
Before you start dismantling
your own piano, may 1 say that
the author of “Basic Music”
developed his ideas on the key-
board of a piano accordion,
and any experiments on the
part of the reader are best
done on a similar instrument.
I McL
Chords by Colour
VERY interesting and
perplexing book called
“Basic Music” has just been
published by Stockwells.
The author is Gordon Wor-
mald, a trained musician
who uses the title “Basic
Music’’ to introduce an idea
to make music easier — the
complete re-o/ganisation of
the standard piano key-
board.
Mr. Wormald conceives the
re-organisation thus; “All the
keys are identical in shape
and size and are rounded at
the top and at the front end.
The keys arc alternately col-
oured and white, the colours
being from left to right —
Black, red (corresponding to
key C in orthodox keyboard),
blue, yellow, green and pink.
This order is repeated through-
out the keyboard-
“To assist further the easy
identification of the keys, the
back ends of these are shaded
to form a series of arches,
commencing and ending on a
black key”.
DIFFICULTY
The author is convinced that
the present method of arrang-
ing the keys is wrong and is
the main cause of the difficulty
of studying music. With the
JAZZ NEWS — Saturday December 24, 1960
Page 17
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTS.
The rate for All Classified
Advertisements and entries
for “Club Diary’’ is 4d. per
word. AH words (except
first two) in black capitals—
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Box Numbers have an addi-
tional Service Fee of 1/-.
All Classified Advertise-
ments must be. prepaid and
arrive not later than first
post Monday for insertion
in the issue of the same
week.
For a series of 13 insertions
special discounts and credit
terms are offered.
All communications should
be addressed to:
The Advertising Manager
(Classified)
“JAZZ NEWS”
37, Soho S<|uarc,
London, W.|.
Phone: GERrard 6601/2
TUITION
JOHN LIVESEY’ Streatham
Hill Studios for trumpet, Slide
Valve trombone, guitar TUL
0160.
OWEN BRVCE — Trumpet
WOO 3631.
SOME of Britain's greatest
Jazzmen have come from the
ERIC GILDER SCHOOL
OF MUSIC (formerly Central
School of Dance Music)
Prospectus: 195. Wardour
Street, W 1 REG 0644
RECORDING
TAPE, DISC TAPE transfer
from your own recordings
Audition Finest US A tapes
available 1,800 ft. 35s. Sound
News. 10 Clifford Street. W.l
PERSONAL
FRIENDSHIP MARRIAGE
Write Lorraines Bureau. John
Street. Blackburn. Lancs
TEENAGJiRS ! Pen friends
anywhere- Send s-a-e. Teenage
Club, Falcon House, Burnley
MAKE FRIENDS anywhere,
opposite sex. seventeen to
seventy. Details from Personal
Column. Falcon House. Brrn-
ley.
UNMARRIED PEOPLES As-
sociation. 87, Terrace, Tor-
quay Friendship/Marriage in-
troductions everywhere. Bro-
chure free-
PEN FRIENDS at home or
abroad. Stamped envelope for
details. European Friendship
Society, Olney, Bucks.
AMERICAN PEN PALS.
Thousands of American teen-
agers want British Pen Pals—
For details send s, a. e. to
Secretary Anglo - American
Club. 38, Crawford Street,
London, W.l.
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
. . and with it
A GREAT NEW BAND
THE SUPERB
ROD MASON
JAZZ
BAND
l^eaturing
ROD MASON, Cornet
ROGER BALL, Clarinet
VIC STOCKWELL, Trombone
LYN SAUNDERS, Banjo
ALAN JAMES, Bass
and
The Best in Blues
since Bessie . . .
Miss LIZA SPURR
Now Fully Professional,
Available Anywhere
Enquiries:
104, St. George’s Square,
S.W.l,
::
WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ?
“LAZY ADE” MONSBOURGH
A DE made a tremendous
name here when he
toured with the Graeme
Bell Australian jazz band
(first in 1947), an event now
considered by the British
jazz historians to have
sparked off the Revival
movesnent in Britain
The band was working its
way over from Czechoslo-
vakia (where they took their
wages in copies of their own
records!) and after a lean
time on tour here, hit the
headlines at the Leicester
Square Jazz Club. This was
where the Revival ‘came to
Town' and the band had an
enormous influence on the
younger musicians.
Adc played trombone,
clarinet and trumpet with
the band, which at this time
featured very varied front
line combinations of instru-
ments (such as two trumpets
and clarinet, or two clarin-
ets and trumpet, and some-
times entirely muted brass
ensembles).
The band was recorded
on Esquire, and Humphrey
Ljttelton, Eddie Harvey
and Dave Carey made guest (
appearances at the sessions,
Ade is now resident in
Melbourne, Australia, play-
ing tenor almost exclusively,
and, like the rest of the
Bell band, has gone semi-
pro. He runs the Pan Re-
corder Company, making
these instruments from Tas-
manian myrtle, and sup-
plies all the Government
schools in New South
Wales- 43 His year. Ade
married an English girl on
the way back home, and has
a group with ex-Bell boys
Bud Baker and Russ Mur-
phy, playing in and around
Melbourne-
ln June of this year, a
special concert was put to-
gether, consisting of a re-
formed Bell band, with the
boys flying in from all
corners of the country'. They
could fit in one rehearsal
only and played a thorough-
ly successful session, the
more remarkable as the
band had not met together
since 1952-
*! i
BAND GALL
CALLING ALL BANDS !
CALLING ALL LEADERS !
Here is the best and most economi-
cal method to advertise your band
to the many thousands who read
“JAZZ NEWS” — the only weekly
Jazz Newsmagazine,
The Rate is 4d per ord The first
two words appear in Black Capitals
— all additional words in this type
2d. per word extra.
For a series of 13 weekly insertions
a special discount and credit terms
ar^ offered.
Write or Call: The Advertisement
Manager, “Jazz News”, 37 Soho
Square, W.l. Phone GERrard
5601-2.
PATTI AND THE CLUBMEN.
Rann DAVE KEIR. CRO 1815.
KANSAS CITY JAZZMEN.
WELIesden 7985.
MAINLINE NEW ORLEANS
JAZZMEN. S.E. London. FOR
4377.
KID MARTYN’S RAGTIME
BAND. Phone P. Dyer. GERrard
8646.
SIR CHARLES GALBRAITH
and his TRADITIONAL GEN-
TLEMEN. GERrard 7985.
CHRIS WALKER JAZZ BAND.
PINner 5161,
PREACHER HOODS JAZZ
MISSIONARIES. Slough 20535.
THE MARDI GRAS JAZZMEN.
Sunbury-on-1 hames 2338.
ALVIN ROY
And His SARATOGA
JAZZBAND
Winners of the I960 Jazz News
Jazz Band Competition
Now Recording for
Ember Records
All Enquiries:
c/o 19. Vincent Square.
Wood Green. .N 22 COV. 2745
KANSAS CITY
JAZZMEN
Enquiries:
14 HARLESDEN ROAD.
LONDON. N W 10
True to the jazz Tradition
The Famous
SOUTHERN
STOMPERS
with
PAM
32 Kenton Lane. Kenton.
Harrow, Mx. WOR 5583
GERRY BROWN JAZZMEN
Ol
BOURNEMOUTH
with JO COLLINSON
Manager; 9 Turton Street Weymouth