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Jazz News Volume4 No45 0005

Jazz News Volume4 No45 0005

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Page 8
JAZZ NEWS — Saturday. December 24, 1960
FRIDAY. 23rd DECEMBER
P.M.
1.03
4.40
7-15
8.15
S.15
9.30
9 30
9.30
9.45
10.00
' I 10
Ted Heath (A) 27
Jazz (S) 35
Miriam Makeba (South
Africa); Harry Arnold
(Sweden) (AA) 45
Big hands of Mulligan,
Herman, Shaw, James,
Brookmeyer. Stewart,
Soloists; Getz. Gibbs.
Sims Rich, Jordan. Ben-
ny Morton, Wells. Hig-
ginbotham, Bailey Web-
ster. Coleman Hawkins.
(AA) 45
Jazz with Joe (BBC Ger-
man Service on 232 metres
—30 mins.)
Portrait o£ Mr. Anthony,
trumpeter and leader
(AF) 30
For Jazz Lovers (AE) 60
-— News at 10
Jazz Courier (R) 30
Ted Heath (K) 30
Sweet and Swing (AF) 60
Dance and Jazz Records
i K) 50
SATURDAY,
24«I. DECEMBER
A.M.
10.55
I 1.18
P.M.
1 2.05
3.30
4.00
4.01
4.10
8.00
Records (E) 15
Records (E) 12
Records (E) 10.
Jazz Journal (O') 30
Jazz Club (M) 30
Billy Taylor's trio.
Double Six of Paris.
Colemon Haw'kins, Tom-
my Flanagan. Wendell
Marshall Horace Silver.
Blue Mitchell. Joe New-
man, Frank Wess (Mon-
treal 16.84 metres)
Jazz Panorama (A) 20
Records presented by
Barry Alldis (Q) 30
Sonny Stitt. Horace Sil-
ver, Herbie Mann. Davis.
Farmer, Moody, Arnett
Cobb. Pepper (AA) 45
9.30 For Jazz Lovers (AE) 60—
News at 10
10.00 Just Jazz (BBC Light)
SUNDAY, 25th DECEMBER
P.M.
4.45 Louis Armstrong's orch.
Concert from C.N.l.T.
(E) 86
815 Ralph Burns’ ‘’Winter
Sequence-’ and three by
Herman (AA) 45
9.00 Spirituals: When Jesus
was born (Golden Gate
Quartet); I Want to be
Like Jesus (Ward Sin-
gers); Help Me Jesus
(Staple Singers); Rise IJp
Shepherd and follow Me
(Dorothy Maynor); Sweet
Little Jesus Boy (Mahalia
Jackson) (E) 20
9.08 For Jazz Lovers (AE) 1*12
-—News at 10
9.15 Dance and Jazz records
(K) 105
9.30 Mr. Acker Bilk (Q) 30
9.50 Jazz News (E) 25
10.00 Message of Jazz (A) 55
10.30 Deep River Boys and
Tonv Kinsev's quartet
(Q) 30
11.05 Jazz and Near Jazz (fü
55
MONDAY, 26th DECEMBER
A.M.
10.15 Jazz requests (F) 15
P.M.
5-15 Pim Jacobs’ trio with
Rita Revs (M) 35
6.30 Jazz (AB) 20
8.00 Ronnie Aldrich's Squad-
cats (Q) 30
8.15 New records: Kenton,
Makeba, Turrentine, Bla-
key (AA) 45
9.10 Jazz in Blue (A) 45
9.30 For Jazz Lovers (AE) 6Q
—News at 10
TUESDAY. 27lh DECEMBER
P.M.
7.50 Jazzmen's homage to
Oscar Pettiford: Luis
Fuentes, Getz, Francois
Jeanneau, Bud Powell,
Toots Thielemans, Lucky
Thompson, Rene Urtre-
ger (E) 60
8 00 Jazz at the Philharmonic
from Berlin Sports Palast
with Coleman Hawkins,
Webster, Getz, Eldridge.
J. J. Johnson, Dizzy
Gillespie's quartet (V) 30
8.15 Jazz in 1960 (AF) 45
8.15 Stan Kenton at the Las
Vegas Tropicana (AA) 45
8.30 Harry Arnold's Jazz
Show (U) 30
9.30 For Jazz Lovers (AE) 60
9.30 Bryan Hopper's Chica-
goans (D) 15
9.30 Jazz in 1960 (X) 45
9.30 Swing Easy (W) 25
9.50 Moonlight in Vermont
(Mulligan); Moonlight in
Vermont (Ella); Moon-
light in Vermont (Eddie
Davis): Midriff (Blakey);
Old Man River (Bru-
beck). Flving home (Bar-
net) (E' 25
WEDNESDAY,
28th DECEMBER
P.M.
12.20 Ramblers (M) 25
3.00 Best Discs of 1960 by
Panassie (F) 23
5-30 Modern Jazz (A) 25
6.30 Network 3 (BBC) Jazz
records
8.15 Young New Yorkers:
Stanley Turrentine. Ho-
race Parian, George
Tucker and A1 Harewood.
Mainstream West Coast-
ers: Harry Edison, Mur-
ray McEachem, Benny
Carter. Willie Smith and
Babe Russin (AA) 45
9:15 Edelhagen and Francis-
Coppieter’s trio. Big
Noise from Winnetka;
Blues for Bohemia: Bingo
i'|imillll!lllllllll!ll1INI!lllllllllll!HI!lllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllimilllllllllllllllllllimi!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIII!llllll!IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIII£
= A—Brussels 1. 483.9 metres.
¿3 B—Brussels 2. 324 metres.
== C—Denmark 1. 210 metres.
= D—Eireann. 530 metres.
~ E—France 1. 1,829, 193 and
48.39 metres.
1 F—France 2. 347, 218, 422,
359 and 455 metres.
= G—France 3 280, 242, 222
= H—Bavaria 375 and 1S7
5 I—Fast Germany 287 metres.
2 J—Frankfurt 505.8 metres.
1 K—N.W.D.R. 309, 199, 397
Key te Radio Jazz
L—Hilversum 1. 402 metres.
M—Hilversum 2. 298 metres.
N—Italy 1. 344 and 225
O -Italy 2. 355, 269 and 290
P—Luxembourg (French), 1293
0—Luxembourg (English) 20S
R—Monte Carlo 205 metres.
S—Norway 288, 877 melres.
T—Sottetis 393 metres.
U—Sweden 1570, 505.9, 306,
254, 245 metres.
V—RIAS Berlin 303, 49.94
W—A F.N. 344 and 271
X—Sudwestfunk 295, 363, 195
Y—Denmark 2. 188, 202, 210
and 283 metres.
Z—Strasbourg 1. 258 metres.'
AA—V O.A. Short Wave, 13,
19, 31, 49 and 75 metre
bands.
AB—Limoges, 379 metres.
AC—Brussels 4 on 199 metres.
AD—Saarbrucken 211 melres.
AH—Europe. 1647 metres.
AF—Bremen 221 and 278
Bop; Blues for Tiny (K)
15
9.30 For Jazz Lovers (AE) 60
—News at 10
9.50 Jazz on the Champs Ely-
sees (E) 25
10 00 Real Jazz (P) 60
10.00 Jazz Antiquities (H) 45
10 05 American jazz: Decem-
er Children (V) 55
10.15 What’s new in Jazz (M)
40
11.10 Year of Jazz (X) 50
THURSDAY,
29th DECEMBER
P.M.
4.05 German Prize Jazz Discs
1960 (AF) 55
4.30 Jazz (M) 30
5-30 Pia Beck's jazz quartet
(M) 15
7.30 Jazz in 1960 (Y) 40
8.15 Ray Anthony orch. with
Georgie Auld, Ray Sims.
Med Flory. Also Thelo-
nious Monk (AA) 45
8.30 Tony Crombie band and
the Eddie Thompson Trio
(B) 30
9 30 Musician and his storv
(W) 25
9.30 For Jazz Lovers (AE) 60
—News at 10
9.50 Ko-Ko (Ellington); Biues
Oriental (Adderley):
Shout’em Aunt Tillie
(Ellington); Trope at Saint
Trop (Hodeir); This Here
(Adderley) (E) 25
10.00 Belafonte; Laurindo Al-
meida, guitar (U) 30
10.40 Jazz Club BBC. Light
“iHlillllilllllllllllllllHIIHllllilliiiiiiliHlliliiil)iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiliiiHailliiHUIiiillinUilllliiiiiiiiiiiiUlililliiiiUH»iliiiIlliiiilliliiiilmiliiiliiiiliIillilllUiilHS
JIMMY A R C H E Y , RUBY
BRAFF, IOE DARENSBtJRG,
HARRY GARRISON, ZUTTY
SINGLETON nnd GEORGE
WETTLINC
ARP AMONO TUP MANY
WTIO SUBSCRIBE TO
CODA
The Canadian
Jazz Magazine
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Canada and the USA
Subscribe NOYV — Send 15$ to
MISS RAE WITTRICK
3, Whitefriars Crescent
WestcHfF-on-Sea, Essex
England.
JAZZ NEWS — Saturday, December 24, 1960
Page 9
FOLK
IN
THE FUTURE
0WHAT WILL 1961 hold for the folk
world? One can only give personal opini-
ons but the traits shown throughout this
current year point the way of what may
be the general pattern.
Firstly oni (he popular, mass front, the
breaks are appearing now through TV,
radio, some records and a limited Dumber
of live concerts.
It would seem that this mass, popular
presentation will expand in the following
ways:-
BROADCASTS
1) By radio and television time being given
to iolk singers, possibly more groups than
solo artists, and the possibility that on either
sound or vision outline folk type programmes
will put in their first appearances.
(2) The expansion mto the live theatre,
field of folk artists taking part in existing
variety or other programmes, and the pos-
sible expansion in same cases to whole folk
tvpe shows, though this fnay not be on a
large scale. The existing presentation of the
full sizo folk-blues programmes such as those
which Ballads and Blues presents in some of
the bigger cities and (he potential that this
could attract an increasing audience making
it a commercial proposition to run, could be
expanded.
(3) The present hesitating first steps of
some of the major recording companies to
put out folk discs may harden into a definite
policy of backing them for a place in their
catalogues and budgets potentially equal in
the next two or three years with say Jazz
coverage. The utter timidity of the major
companies is just as likely to be replaced by
a mad scramble to throw all sorts of rub-
bish on the market as well but that only
time will sort out
CONCERTS
(4) The jazz concerts, especially trad or
near so, are at present getting some sort
of folk music dished up, and liked only in
Scotland, at least on a biggish concert scale.
How long will they hold out in England
and Wales? Once again it might be srfine-
thing combined with visiting American blues
singers that hits the mark, but good jazz
and related folk have their future place.
Mind you, all such expansions as above
cause some people to gnash their teeth,
sometimes in envy, sometimes under the
cloak of ethnic propriety. Promoters like
thyself cannot say all such activities as out-
lined in this broad general sweep are the
most satisfying, the richest, and of course
not always the most authentic. But like many
fans 1 am a believer in millions listening,
singing, and enjoying folk music, out of
which a percentage small but valuable will
OKI?
NEWS
"Would you say that any musician in particular has influenced your work?”
-----------—--------------1--------i:--------------------—------
move ,*ilo more advanced, more developed
fields steking and listening to ethnic material.
Same process that happens in jazz—imagine
if everyone who was to listen to iazt bad to
start off by listening (o and having to like
one type of music.
RECORDS
To this end nonetheless with the help of
the smaller record companies like Topic and
Collector, the more developed form, of con-
cert will also flourish but of course on a
smaller scale, and certainly not on one which
is a paying proposition but a labour of love,
for the time being anyway. Such conceits
very greatest value, they train the more
or club gatherings will nonetheless be ot^the
particular audience and they provide much
of the source of new material, critical assesv-
meni, and future artists.
MALCOLM NIXON
LETTERS
SCOTT KRUGER HALL
Dear Sir,
Ronnie Scott has always been a lillle
apart from the other musicians as far ¡is
I can see. He possesses that rare quality —
guts. Hence his opening his own club and
DOING something about the British mod-
ern scene. He also has the courage to put
his views into print and damn the conse-
quences.
For this alone he has jny support.
— Xian Ldwards
Ruislip.
Dear Sir.
I've been reading the Scoit v. Kruger
articles with growing horror. Why wash all
this dirty linen in public?
—Gordon Rogers
Beckenham, Kent.
Dear Sir,
1 don’t care w'hether Ronnie Scott. Sam
Kruger or Tony Hall are all right. I'm en-
joying the fun ....
N.l 7 “M T- °gdCn'
Dear Sir,
1 think Ronnie Scott was right to say what
he has about the modern ja*z position but
Sam Kruger had some right on his side too.
No-one is making a fortune out of Modern
and a few people have lost just that. A
hatchet burying should he arranged as soon
as possible. My sympathies go to Tony Hall
who has been dragged into the polemics and
subjected to some very personal criticism
from Ronnie.
John H. Swindon,
Clapham Junction.
Dear Sir.
I'm with Tony Hall. —G. Oilier
Blackpool.
Dear Sir,
1 must agree with Ronnie Scott. Tonv does
go on a bit.
—Robert Masters
Bavswater, \V.