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Town Hall, Leeds. Humphrey Lyttelton_0002.jpg

Town Hall, Leeds. Humphrey Lyttelton_0002.jpg

Inside pages of a programme for a concert by Humphrey Lyttelton and his Band at the Town Hall, Leeds, 14th June 1953, presented by the Leeds University Rhythm Club. Featuring a list of the band's members and a running order for the concert, with the numbers to be performed.

Image Details

Catalogue Reference Number
Creator Unknown
Date Made 1953
Item Format Programme
Title or Caption
Event Date June 14th 1953

This text has been generated by computer from the image and may contain typographical and/or grammatical errors.

Programme
HUMPHREY LYTTELTON AND HIS BAND
l1.1 Humphrey Lyttelton (trumpet), Wally Fawkes (clarinet), Bruce Turner (soprano and alto saxes),
Johnny Parker (piano), George Hopkinson (drums), Freddy Legon (guitar and banjo), Micky Ashman (bass).
MARYLAND, MY MARYLAND PERDIDO STREET BLUES DAINTINESS RAG BLUE FOR WATERLOO HOPPIN' MAD KATER STREET RAC.
This bracket from the Band contains two numbers comparatively new to the repertoire, "Maryland” and "Daintiness Rag. and one which many of you will recognise as one of the first Lyttelton originals, "Blue for Waterloo." This number was recorded on the old London Jaz2 label and has just been recorded again for Parlophone, where it provides the backing to " Maryland:' The other numbers in this bracket are ever popular with jazz audiences and " Hop pin’ Mad "—another Lyttelton original—provides George Hopkinson with the opportunity to provide rhythm on the washboard.
MIKE McKENZIE
Accompanied by Leslie Weeks (drums), Joe Sampson (bass).
I GOT RHYTHM MANHATTAN MOUNTAIN GREENERY
One of the number most loved by the " jam sessions " is Gershwin's " I got rhythm." To-night Mike gives you his own sparkling arrangement of this tune, and follows it with two of the numbers that have proved most popular at Lyttelton Club sessions in London. Both are from the pens of Rogers & Hart and though the titles may not rouse immediate memories, the tunes will most certainly 'be recollected by those who remember the music of the thirties.
HUMPHREY LYTTELTON AND HiS BAND with NEVA RAPHAELLO
I LIKE TO GO BACK IN THE EVENING DOWN IN THE DUMPS KING SIZED POPPA SHAKE IT AND BREAK IT
After one r using number from the Band, Neva Raphaello takes over with two songs, the first of which will be known to all jazz lovers. "Down in the dumps" was recorded by the immortal Bessie Smith and blues singers throughout the years hase paid homage to Bessie by singing her blues. "King sized poppa" is another 12-bar blues but in the more m Jem "jump" idiom. The last number before the interval, "Shake it and break it," is a showcase for the Band and is rapidly proving one of its most popular recordings.
INTERVAL
“HARLEM JAZZ”
with
Mike McKenzie (piano). Joe Harriott (alto-sax), Sam Walker (tenor sax), Fitzroy Coleman (guitar), Leslie Weeks (drums), Joe Sampson (bass) and The Ebonaires.
This section of the programme is something entirely new in which the music of Harlem is presented by an all-coloured cast. Their numbers are : —
THINGS AIN'T WHAT THEY USED TO BE INDIAN SUMMER
HOW LONG MUST I WAIT FOR YOU (with the Ebonaires)
IT S NOT THE MEAT IT’S THE MOTION (with the Ebonaires)
GETTIN SENTIMENTAL
PERDIDO
COTTON-TAIL
"Things ainl . . ." is a Duke Ellington opus which here provides a vehicle for choruses from all these star instrumentalists, and a rocking beat from the rhythm. In quieter vein Sam Walker takes over for a solo on the lovely " pop " " Indian Summer," which has provided many famous jazzmen, including Sidney Bechet, with inspiration. THE EBONAIRES, who now. join the musicians on the stage, are a vocal group which Mike McKenzie has been training for the last two years. They recently received their first big break when asked to record for Parlophone and to-night are presenting a Louis Jordan number, " How long must I wait for you," and a lesser known modern blues.
Back to the instrumentalists for two solo spots, the first devoted to brilliant guitar of Fitzroy Coleman and the second to the equally brilliant alto-sax of Joe Harriott. Finally, the group goes into yet another rousing Ellington tune— " Cotton-tail"
HUMPHREY LYTTELTON AND HIS BAND and NEVA RAPHAELLO
CHATTANOOGA STOMP JAIL BREAK GET IT
DO YOUR DUTY (with Neva Raphaello)
DOWN IN NEW ORLEANS WHERE THE BLUES BEGAN (with Neva Raphaello) WORKING MAN BLUES SHAKE THAT THING SNAKE RAG
" Chattanooga" is yet another example of a tune much played by the Lyttelton Band, recorded, then put away and finally brought off the shelf again, dusted down, and presented with renewed vigour. "Working Man Blues" and "Snake Rag " from later in this bracket are also examples of this process. Our old Australian friend Ade Monsbourgh is responsible for "Get it" and this can never be played without recalling Ade's brilliant sax work with the band of Graeme Bell. "Jail Break" is a request number. Recently recorded for Parlophone, this slow number is based on an old penitentiary song called " Another Man Done Gone."
NEVA RAPHAELLO'S two numbers include another most popular Bessie Smith blues, " Do your duty," and a tune recorded by Louis Armstrong extolling the birthplace of the blues, New Orleans. This latter number is a very recent addition to Neva's large repertoire..