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Back to George Melly & John Chilton's Feetwarmers, Belgrade Theatre, Coventry - March 27th 1977

George Melly & John Chilton's Feetwarmers, Belgrade Theatre, Coventry - March 27th 1977 002

George Melly & John Chilton's Feetwarmers, Belgrade Theatre, Coventry - March 27th 1977 002

Inside front cover and page 1 of a programme for a performance by George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers, Belgrade Theatre, 1977. The inside front cover features a photo of Melly, and a list of songs he is likely to perform. A photograph of John Chilton with George Melly features on page 1, with Chilton discussing his relationship with Melly.

Image Details

Catalogue Reference Number NJA/PRO/32
Creator
Date Made 1977
Item Format Programme
Title or Caption George By John
Event Date 27/03/1977

This text has been generated by computer from the image and may contain typographical and/or grammatical errors.

WILL SELECT HIS PROGRAMME FROM THE FOLLOWING
AIN'T MISBEHAVIN'
ANIMULE BALL BARRELHOUSE MUSIC BLACK MOUNTAIN BLUES BUDDY BOLDEN DOCTOR JAZZ ELECTRIC CHAIR FRANKIE AND JOHNNY GEE BABY
GIVE HER A LITTLE DROP MORE GOOD TIME GEORGE
HARD HEARTED HANNAH IF YOUSE A VIPER
I'LL CATCH YOU WITH YOUR BRITCHES DOWN
IT DON'T MEAN A THING
JEEPERS CREEPERS
KITCHEN MAN
LULU'S BACK IN TOWN
MARIE LAVEAU
MICHIGAN WATER
MILENBERG JOYS
MY CANARY
NOBODY KNOWS YOU
NUTS
OLD FASHIONED LOVE ORGAN GRINDER PENNIES FROM HEAVEN PUNCH DRUNK MAMA PUNCH & JUDY ROLL 'EM PETE SUGAR
TAIN'T NO SIN
TAINT NOBODY'S BUSINESS
THE JOINT IS JUMPIN'
TROUBLE IN MIND
WAITER AND THE PORTER . . .
WAS I DRUNK
WHEN MY SHIP COMES IN
WININ' BOY
YONDER COMES THE BLUES
In accordance with the requirements of the Greater London Council and the Watch Committee of the various towns and cities of the tours, the following conditions must be observed:
1. The public may leave at the end of the performance by all exit and entrance doors and such doors at that time must be open.
2. All gangways, corridors, staircases and external passageways intended for exit shall be kept entirely free from obstruction whether permanent or temporary.
3. Persons shall not be permitted to stand or sit in any of the gangways intersecting the seating, or to sit in anv of the other gang ways or any unseated space in the auditorium, unless standing in such space has been specially allowed by the GLC or the Watch Committee, as applicable. If standing be permitted in the gang ways at the sides and the rear of the seating it shall be limited to the numbers indicated in the notices exhibited in those positions.
4. The safety curtain must be lowered and raised once immediately before the commencement of each performance, so as to ensure it being in proper working order
The Management reserve the right to change the programme without notice and are not held responsible for the non appearance of any artiste.
The Management reserve the right to refuse admittance.
GEORGE'BY JOHN
The first time that the figure of George Melly ever impinged itself on my memory was at the long-established club that still flourishes at 100 Oxford Street, London. It was during the late 1940s, George was then one of the club's regular dancers (or jivers as they were then known) who threw themselves and their female partners about with a vigour that would be considered anti-social in the cramped conditions of today's disco s.
I was far too interested in listening to the music to ever get on to the dance square, George and fifty or so other lissom figures were noticed only as a flurry of movement that might temporarily obscure the sight of Humphrey Lyttelton's right eyebrow.
The first time that George really registered with me as an individual was when it was his eyebrow that was being obscured by a dancer's arm; there he was. Bunny Bum, as the club regulars called him, singing his heart out on stage, obviously having a ball, and the crowd shared his enjoyment.
He didn't seem to be enjoying himself very much when next I heard him sing, the year was 1950, the place Hammersmith Palais. By then, George was the regular singer with Mick Mulligan's Magnolia Jazzband. The band were blowing away in good spirit, George sat on the side of the stage
awaiting the call. His method of whiling away the time seemed distinctly eccentric, his head and leg movements resembled the symptoms of St. Vitus' Dance, whilst his arms kept flying up over his head in the manner of a hell-fire preacher, the accompanying sounds were a series of grunts, and eerie moans—all this before he'd even got on stage. As an 18-year-old erstwhile jazz musician in from quiet suburban Kingsbury I was certain that I was catching my first sight of what was naively called in those days 'a dope fiend'.
I have since been informed by George that in 1950 the substance causing his wild warm-up was certain to be a popular dark stout. Whatever his intake was that night I came to a conclusion that has turned out to be a life-long belief: that George Melly is one of the most extraordinary personalities ever to have capered upon the earth's surface.
During the 1950s, the British public got to know just how entertaining George's capers could be. His work with Mick Mulligan's Band became well known . . . even notorious, but George's goal wasn't notoriety, the anarchist within him was pioneering performer freedom. Twenty years ago Derby magistrates actually banned him from singing one of Bessie Smith's songs—the fact that we can now smile at the foolishness of those ludicrous J.P.s proves how much George and other bold spirits achieved.