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Duke Ellington Orchestra British Tour – October 1958 007

Duke Ellington Orchestra British Tour – October 1958 007

Pages 10 and 11 of a souvenir brochure for Duke Ellington's tour of Britain 5th - 26th October 1958, presented by Harold Davison and Norman Granz. Page 10 features small profiles of Duke Ellington's band members, with adverts on page 11.

Image Details

Catalogue Reference Number NJA/PRO/6
Creator Stanley Dance
Date Made 1958
Item Format Programme
Title or Caption The Musicians of the Ellington Orchestra
Event Date 5th - 26th October 1958
Geographic Location

This text has been generated by computer from the image and may contain typographical and/or grammatical errors.

; THE MUSICIANS OF THE |
■ ELLINGTON ORCHESTRA i
I |
By STANLEY DANCE ■
THE TRUMPETS
RAY NANCE
After playing in the bands of Earl Hines and Horace Henderson, Ray Nance joined Duke Ellington in 1940, when he took the place of one of the great stars. Cootie Williams. Since that time he has grown very much in artistic stature. A versatile musician with a soulful tone, he
blows moving and melodically attractive solos, as well as taking care of much of the “ growl ”
work was that formerly Cootie’s prerogative. His mischievous sense of humour comes through
not only on trumpet, but also in his violin playing and occasional vocals.
HAROLD BAKER
A broad background of experience in such bands as Erskine Tate’s, Don Redman’s, Teddy Wilson’s and Andy Kirk’s preceded Harold Baker's first engagement with Duke in 1938. A regular member of the band from 1943 to 1951, he has only recently returned to it. He is invaluable as a brilliant section leader and as a sensitive soloist—an uncommon combination. The influence of his forthright approach to the role of first chair supplanted the sweet, quasilegitimate, almost namby-pamby conception that had previously prevailed elsewhere. The firm masculinity of his tone, combined with concise, pointed phrasing, produces the kind of definite lead this remarkable trumpet section requires. The individual nature of his musicality appears in his solos with arresting effect.
WILLIAM “CAT” ANDERSON
Cat Anderson joined the band in 1944, left in 1947 for a period as leader of his own group, and rejoined in 1950. He had previously worked with Lucky Millinder, Erskine Hawkins and Lionel Hampton. He is famous for his high notes, often providing climactic propulsion to closing choruses. His more restrained work in the middle register displays the influence of Louis Armstrong, while his “ growl ’’ solos are strictly in the Ellington tradition. In recent years he has also been featured in Latin-American specialities.
CLARK TERRY
Clark Terry's appearance on the jazz scene had something of the effect of a bombshell. Here was another new approach, a new sound, an unusual articulation perhaps inspired by a predecessor in the band, Rex Stewart. His speed, range and control are amazing facets of a technique which probably surpasses that of any of his contemporaries, and these he contrasts with a conception of legato phraseology which is both original and highly affirmative. Prior to joining the band in 1951, he had worked with George Hudson, Charlie Barnet and Count Basie.
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