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Back to Duke Ellington Orchestra British Tour – July 1933

Duke Ellington Orchestra British Tour – July 1933 006

Duke Ellington Orchestra British Tour – July 1933 006

Pages 10 and 11 of a Duke Ellington concert programme, for Ellington's tour of the United Kingdom presented by Melody Maker, 1933. Page 11 features profiles of Duke Ellington's rhythm section. An advert for Gibson instruments features on page 10, extolling their 'six string' guitars.

Image Details

Catalogue Reference Number NJA/PRO/7
Creator Spike Hughes
Date Made 1933
Item Format Programme
Title or Caption
Event Date 1933

This text has been generated by computer from the image and may contain typographical and/or grammatical errors.

WELCOME DUKE ELLINGTON !
and yet another
Triumph!
FRED GUY OF DUKE ELLINGTON'S ORCHESTRA PLAYS A GIGSON “6 STRING '' GUITAR - 11
GIBSON PLAYERS ALL!
DUKE ELLINGTON’S RHYTHM SECTION.
HARRY SHERMAN
Carroll Gibbons’ Savoy Orph.
ALBERT HARRIS
Jack Padbury’s Band
GEO» DICKINSON
Henry Hall’s B.B.C. Band
BILL TR1NGHAM
Late of Bert Ambrose’s Blue Lyres
GEO* ELLIOTT
Pas. Troise’s Mandoliers
HARRY DAVIES
Astoria Romany Band
BERT THOMAS
Radio and Recording Artist
NICK LUCAS
American Recording Star
ALLAN FERGUSON
Recording Artist
EDDIE HAYES
Godowsky’s Orchestra
THE LATE EDDIE LANG
most Rhythmic of all Guitarists
"GET A GIBSON!"
That bit of advice has been passed along thousands of times by America’s leading artists and teachers. It is wise advice. It means complete satisfaction with the fretted instruments you select. So—get a
fM1
SEND NOW FOR CATALOGUES
POST
10
THE RHYTHM SECTION.
DRUMS, ETC.—Sonny Greer, born at Long Branch, New Jersey, in 1902, is one of the original members ot the Ellington band, and probably one of the three finest percussion players in dance music. Technically, of course, like every other member of the band, he is a fine musician. It there is any particular branch of drumming which he has made his own it is in the use of wire brushes ; the ripple of brushes upon the side drum in blues numbers is something very typical of the music-making ot Sonny Greer. I also venture to suggest that his use of tympani will prove
cm/=>fiVa i n rr npw Tunrotrc* U/VlPYP
(in dance music) these instruments are hardly ever.used for more than freak bass parts. Few players think, like Greer, to use tympani to accent and emphasise the melody. {Centre.)
STRING BASS. -Wellman Braud, originally Breaux, is the veteran of the orchestra, fo'r he was born in St. lames Parish, Louisiana, in 1891. He was in England a few years ago with Will Vodery’s Plantation orchestra. Braud is one of the most famous of recording bass-players , his tone and attack are distinctive and the ease and clearness with which he has always been recorded is said rn he due to his evenly attacked
pizzicato, [n the flesh he will be heard to play with the same attack and precision. Is-said to possess a tuba, but has rarely been heard to play it. (Right.)
BANJO AND GUITAR.—Fred Guy, born Virginia, 1897, is another of the very earliest members of the orchestra. Guy is probably the one Ellington musician who gets least credit and limelight for his work. Actually, as you will hear, he is a fine guitarist and an exceedingly lightfingered banjoist, with a fast tremolando on the latter instrument which is unusually effective in blues numbers (Left.)
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